Andrew Martin

Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies
Faculty

Andrew Martin CV [pdf]

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Social movements, the labor movement, organizations, sociology of work, quantitative methods. Current research projects include the use of social movement theory to analyze union organizing efforts and strike activity; the increase of public-order disturbances across college campuses; and the ways in which social movement actors construct frames to reach wider audiences.
 

Early in my research career I was primarily interested in how labor unions mobilized workers, through both organizing drives and labor strikes.  Much of my research drew heavily from social movement scholarship and organizational theories of power and bureaucracy.  My recent research has sought to build on this interest in working-class mobilization in a number of ways.  First, I have begun to assess how unions mobilize external support during conflicts with employers.  Such groups can range from local churches to prominent national politicians.  I have also taken a greater interest in the role of the media in union/firm conflicts, assessing who reporters turn to for quotes during these contests.  My more recent collaborative work expands this interest in corporation mobilization by examining broader efforts by groups, union and non-union alike to curb the growth of corporate power in America. 

 Early in my research career I was primarily interested in how labor unions mobilized workers, through both organizing drives and labor strikes.  Much of my research drew heavily from social movement scholarship and organizational theories of power and bureaucracy.  My recent research has sought to build on this interest in working-class mobilization in a number of ways.  First, I have begun to assess how unions mobilize external support during conflicts with employers.  Such groups can range from local churches to prominent national politicians.  I have also taken a greater interest in the role of the media in union/firm conflicts, assessing who reporters turn to for quotes during these contests.  My more recent collaborative work expands this interest in corporation mobilization by examining broader efforts by groups, union and non-union alike to curb the growth of corporate power in America.  Early in my research career I was primarily interested in how labor unions mobilized workers, through both organizing drives and labor strikes.  Much of my research drew heavily from social movement scholarship and organizational theories of power and bureaucracy.  My recent research has sought to build on this interest in working-class mobilization in a number of ways.  First, I have begun to assess how unions mobilize external support during conflicts with employers.  Such groups can range from local churches to prominent national politicians.  I have also taken a greater interest in the role of the media in union/firm conflicts, assessing who reporters turn to for quotes during these contests.  My more recent collaborative work expands this interest in corporation mobilization by examining broader efforts by groups, union and non-union alike to curb the growth of corporate power in America.

Areas of Expertise
  • Methodology
  • Comparative & Historical
  • Social Movements
Education
  • Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 2004

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Phone:
614 247-6641
Fax:
614 292-6687
209 Townshend Hall
1885 Neil Avenue Mall
Columbus, Ohio 43210