Job Talk: Dr. Dana Moss

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Dr. Dana Moss
February 14, 2020
11:00AM - 12:15PM
Location
Townshend Hall, Room 248

Date Range
Add to Calendar 2020-02-14 11:00:00 2020-02-14 12:15:00 Job Talk: Dr. Dana Moss Please join the sociology department as we welcome job candidate Dr. Dana Moss. Talk title and abstract are below. No RSVP required. Title: The Arab Spring Abroad: Explaining Diaspora Mobilization Against Authoritarian Regimes Abstract: Exiles and expatriates are uniquely advantaged to wield what economist Albert Hirschman calls “voice” after “exit” to influence political change at home and foreign policy abroad. Despite their importance in international affairs, however, surprisingly little is known about when diaspora movements mobilize or how their interventions vary. Moss' book titled The Arab Spring Abroad: Diaspora Mobilization Against Authoritarian Regimes fills this gap. Using original data on Libyan, Syrian, and Yemeni mobilization in the US and Great Britain for the Arab Spring, she shows that diaspora mobilization against authoritarian regimes is a highly contingent force for change. By identifying the mechanisms that both constrain and fuel voice after exit, Moss' research provides original insights into the dynamics of contention in a globalized world.  Townshend Hall, Room 248 Sociology sociology-info@osu.edu America/New_York public
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Please join the sociology department as we welcome job candidate Dr. Dana Moss. Talk title and abstract are below. No RSVP required.

Title: The Arab Spring Abroad: Explaining Diaspora Mobilization Against Authoritarian Regimes

Abstract: Exiles and expatriates are uniquely advantaged to wield what economist Albert Hirschman calls “voice” after “exit” to influence political change at home and foreign policy abroad. Despite their importance in international affairs, however, surprisingly little is known about when diaspora movements mobilize or how their interventions vary. Moss' book titled The Arab Spring Abroad: Diaspora Mobilization Against Authoritarian Regimes fills this gap. Using original data on Libyan, Syrian, and Yemeni mobilization in the US and Great Britain for the Arab Spring, she shows that diaspora mobilization against authoritarian regimes is a highly contingent force for change. By identifying the mechanisms that both constrain and fuel voice after exit, Moss' research provides original insights into the dynamics of contention in a globalized world.